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Dollinger elected science fellow

Acting Supreme Court Justice Richard A. Dollinger, left, receives his fellowship in the Advanced Science & Technology Adjudication Resource Center from Judge Robert M. Bell, the former chief justice of the Maryland Court of Appeals, in White Plains in September.  Courtesy Courtesy Justice Richard A. Dollinger

Acting Supreme Court Justice Richard A. Dollinger, left, receives his fellowship in the Advanced Science & Technology Adjudication Resource Center from Judge Robert M. Bell, the former chief justice of the Maryland Court of Appeals, in White Plains in September. Courtesy Courtesy Justice Richard A. Dollinger

Acting Supreme Court Justice Richard A. Dollinger was elected a fellow of the Advanced Science and Technology Adjudication Resource Center during a ceremony in September at the New York State Judicial Institute in White Plains.

Also known as ASTAR, the national program helps in the education of judges on scientific matters. Justice Dollinger, in his work to obtain the fellowship, attended programs on cognitive development and direct-to-consumer genetic testing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, genetic sequencing and the human genome project at the Broad Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the science of environment crimes at the New York Judicial Institute.

He chaired a working subcommittee on human brain development and autism in North Carolina and led working sessions on issues related to direct-to-consumer genetic testing. A member of the New York Court of Claims appointed by Gov. David A. Paterson in 2009, Justice Dollinger received the fellowship in a ceremony presided over by former Chief Justice of the Maryland Court of Appeals Robert M. Bell.

Justice Dollinger was one of 24 judges statewide to achieve the fellowship. He joins Justice Matthew A. Rosenbaum as an ASTAR fellow in the Seventh Judicial District.

As part of the program, Justice Dollinger authored an article entitled “Admissibility of Direct to Consumer Genetic Tests in Court Proceedings.” The article, which discusses the emergence of direct-to-consumer testing and the potential complications for trial judges, is slated for publication in January 2014 in a new journal, Science in the Courtroom, published by the National Courts and Science Institute, Inc. through Landes Bioscience of Austin, Texas.

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