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Feds stall Hell’s Angels violent drug-dealing operation

Two of 10 defendants charged with federal crimes committed as part of the Hell’s Angels motorcycle gang pleaded guilty Wednesday in U.S. District Court.

Robert W. Moran Jr. leaving the Kenneth B. Keating federal courthouse in Rochester after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit assault with a dangerous weapon in aid of racketeering activity.

Robert W. Moran Jr. leaving the Kenneth B. Keating federal courthouse in Rochester after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit assault with a dangerous weapon in aid of racketeering activity.

Robert W. “Bugsy” Moran Jr., 63, of Rochester, sergeant at arms and a vice president in the Hell’s Angels in Rochester, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit assault with a dangerous weapon in aid of racketeering activity.

U.S. District Court Judge Charles J. Siragusa scheduled sentencing for May 25. Under a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Moran is expected to get 18 months in prison.

Gina Tata, 52, also of Rochester, pleaded guilty to accessory after the fact to the crime of conspiracy to commit assault with a dangerous weapon in aid of racketeering activity. She is scheduled to be sentenced May 25 and is expected to get six months in prison.

Moran and Tata are among a group of Hell’s Angels members accused of various crimes, including operating a drug ring, assault and conspiracy.

According to a 2011 indictment, the Hell’s Angels operated a methamphetamine dealing ring in a territory that stretched from Rochester to Interstate 81 near Syracuse.

“Within this territory, the Hell’s Angels Enterprise expected other motorcycle clubs to request and receive their permission to ‘fly their colors,’ ” according to the indictment.

The Rochester Hell’s Angels required members of other motorcycle clubs to attend their events, buy items they sold and pay dues to the Rochester Area Coalition, which includes motorcycle clubs in the Rochester area, according to the 11-page indictment.

“Members of the Hell’s Angels Enterprise used violence and threats of violence to promote and protect the criminal activity engaged in by various members of the enterprise,” according to the indictment.

One such incident happened on May 31, 2006, at Spenders bar, 1600 Lyell Ave., where Moran beat a customer with a baseball bat after Tata, the bartender at Spenders, allegedly heard the man threaten to kill a member of the Hell’s Angels.

Another member of the Hell’s Angels stole and destroyed the hard drive from the video surveillance system at Spenders because it contained a recording of the attack.

On Monday, James Henry McAuley Jr., a vice president of the Hell’s Angels in Rochester, also known as Mitch the Mooch or Mitch the Menace, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine. He will be sentenced May 24 and is expected to get between 262 and 327 months in prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Brett Harvey.

McAuley’s wife, Donna Boon, also known as “The Queen,” pleaded guilty Monday to narcotics conspiracy. She is schedule to be sentenced May 24 and will get probation, with home incarceration, under a plea agreement.

Gordon L. Montgomery pleaded guilty earlier in February to narcotics conspiracy, he is awaiting sentencing. Richard E. Riedman, pleaded guilty in 2014 to the same charge and was sentenced to 37 months in prison.

Paul S. Griffin was sentenced to probation after pleading guilty to drug conspiracy. Timothy M. Stone pleaded guilty to accessory after the fact and was sentenced to 12 months, plus one day, in prison, Harvey said.

Cases are still pending against two more defendants, Jeffrey A. Tyler, known as “Moses,” and Richard W. Mar, known as “Chief,” “The Professor,” or “Hoki Jamoki.”