Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
Home / Law (page 1100) /

Law

Rochester Legal Briefs: April 2, 2001

Police Officer’s Conduct Not Grounds To Vacate The defendant’s motion to vacate his conviction based on newly discovered evidence, the post trial conduct of a police officer, is denied. A Rochester police officer was charged with misdemeanors arising out of ...

Read More »

Law school can't use race as admissions factor (8055)

Since 1948, the Law School Admission Test has been a focal point in determining who gets admitted to law schools. That may be changing in light of legal battles over affirmative action and the most recent decision by U.S. District ...

Read More »

Rochester Legal Briefs: March 30, 2001 (8056)

Stipulation To Identity Does Not Bar Photographs The defendant’s request that the People be barred from introducing photographs of the deceased victims during their lives or testimony of the deceased victims’ family members identifying the deceased victims’ bodies and how ...

Read More »

Conviction, sentence based on duplicitous charges (8057)

Was a man convicted and sentenced on the same count twice≠ This was the question before the U.S. State Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in U.S. v. Elbert L. Sturdivant. The defendant was convicted of one count of ...

Read More »

Latest round of IRS case rulings (8058)

Taxpayers have typically struggled with the length of the Internal Revenue Code’s statutory guidelines for depreciation of real estate (39 years for non-residential real estate and 27.5 years for residential rental property). In recent history however, the tax court has ...

Read More »

Law school can't use race as admissions factor

Since 1948, the Law School Admission Test has been a focal point in determining who gets admitted to law schools. That may be changing in light of legal battles over affirmative action and the most recent decision by U.S. District ...

Read More »

Rochester Legal Briefs: March 30, 2001

Stipulation To Identity Does Not Bar Photographs The defendant’s request that the People be barred from introducing photographs of the deceased victims during their lives or testimony of the deceased victims’ family members identifying the deceased victims’ bodies and how ...

Read More »

Conviction, sentence based on duplicitous charges

Was a man convicted and sentenced on the same count twice? This was the question before the U.S. State Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in U.S. v. Elbert L. Sturdivant. The defendant was convicted of one count of ...

Read More »

Latest round of IRS case rulings

Taxpayers have typically struggled with the length of the Internal Revenue Code’s statutory guidelines for depreciation of real estate (39 years for non-residential real estate and 27.5 years for residential rental property). In recent history however, the tax court has ...

Read More »

Overly broad warrant does not suppress evidence (8054)

In People v. Brown, No. 23, the Court of Appeals affirmed the rulings by the Supreme Court and the Appellate Division that despite the fact that part of the warrant was overly broad, the severance doctrine kept the rest of ...

Read More »

Penalties for police officers' offenses questioned

In two CPLR Article 78 proceedings the New York State Court of Appeals was asked to determine whether Appellate Division erred in its application of the principles governing judicial review of administrative penalties. This was the question before the state’s ...

Read More »

Overly broad warrant does not suppress evidence

In People v. Brown, No. 23, the Court of Appeals affirmed the rulings by the Supreme Court and the Appellate Division that despite the fact that part of the warrant was overly broad, the severance doctrine kept the rest of ...

Read More »